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Outsourcing USF Governance to Private Entity Violates Constitution: New TechFreedom Amicus Brief

In Rights by Michael Rae

Today, TechFreedom filed an amicus brief urging the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit to hold that the Federal Communications Commission’s “private delegation” of its authority to a non-governmental entity violates the Constitution. Congress delegated to the FCC the task of running the Universal Service Fund, a program that Reaqd more at TechFreedom.org

Living in and With Canada’s Tent Cities

In Rights by poladmin

TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers and interviews with experts in their own words. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA’s work check out “THE LATEST” section of our website. Chances are you have seen or heard of a “tent city.” These semi-permanent urban encampments seem to appear on the news with increasing frequency, especially in Canadian cities like Vancouver, Victoria, and Toronto. Instead of finding a new place to sleep Read More

Learn About Migrant Rights in Canada

In Rights by poladmin

TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers and interviews with experts in their own words. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA’s work check out “THE LATEST” section of our website. Overview Temporary foreign workers are a vital part of Canada’s workforce at many different levels, including Seasonal Agricultural Workers who help get local food into the homes of Canadians. While the temporary foreign workers or “migrant workers” are only allowed to enter Read …

Explainer: Alberta’s Controversial Critical Infrastructure Defence Act

In Rights by poladmin

TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers and interviews with experts in their own words. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA’s work check out “THE LATEST” section of our website. The right to gather and protest is fundamental in a democratic society. In Canada, it’s also protected under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. But that doesn’t mean governments haven’t tried to curtail protest rights in the past. In fact, in 2019, Read …

Learn From an Expert: Leo McGrady, Q.C., Discusses Civil Disobedience in ‘An Age of Protest’

In Rights by poladmin

TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers and interviews with experts in their own words. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA’s work check out “THE LATEST” section of our website. Since the late 1960s, Leo McGrady has published the Guide to the Law of Protest and travelled around the country conducting workshops for individuals and organizations about civil disobedience. As part of the Talk Rights Project, the CCLA spoke with him about Read …

How Provinces Are Using a Decades-Old Legal Tool to Create Hospital “Bubble Zones”

In Rights by poladmin

TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers and interviews with experts in their own words. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA’s work check out “THE LATEST” section of our website. In 1995, British Columbia became the first province in Canada to introduce a law creating “safe access zones” – commonly called “bubble zones” – around facilities related to providing abortion services. Nearly three decades later, provinces are drawing from the same toolbox Read …

Three Stories of Housing Discrimination

In Rights by poladmin

TalkRights features content produced by CCLA volunteers and interviews with experts in their own words. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent the CCLA’s own policies or positions. For official publications, key reports, position papers, legal documentation, and up-to-date news about the CCLA’s work check out “THE LATEST” section of our website. In Canada, there are laws in place to prevent landlords from discriminating against existing and potential tenants based on certain characteristics such as gender and race. But how do we tell if a landlord’s words or actions cross the line? Courts Read More

Civil Society Calling for Robust Inquiry Into Use of Emergencies Act

In Rights by poladmin

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) is joining with a diverse group of civil society organizations to call on the Federal Government’s inquiry to have broad terms of reference and include the power to compel witnesses and the production of documents. “Let’s be crystal clear: an inquiry that does not include the sworn testimony of the major players involved and the production of documents is a sham,” said Cara Zwibel, Director of Fundamental Freedoms for the CCLA. “The people of Canada deserve to hear from their officials about why they took the steps they did. …

SCC Rules on Constitutionality of Post-Arrest Searches of Houses

In Rights by poladmin

On Friday April 8 the Supreme Court released its ruling in R v Stairs, a case that examined police authority to conduct a warrantless search of a house after a person has been arrested. CCLA intervened in the case to argue that the police must have reasonable and probable grounds to search someone’s home incident to arrest.  In our view, the Charter should permit searches of a home incident to arrest in two specific circumstances: imminent risks to officer safety and imminent risks of the destruction of evidence.  The scope of the search of a home incidental to arrest must be limited by the purpose …

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If Common Carriage Doesn’t Work for Broadband, Why Should It Work for Social Media?

In Rights by Michael Rae

That’s the question we asked in our letter to the House Energy & Commerce Committee after FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr testified before its Subcommittee on Communications and Technology in late March. In his testimony, Carr recommended what would amount to a new Fairness Doctrine for the Internet, involving non-discrimination requirements Reaqd more at TechFreedom.org

CCLA Moving Forward with Appeal of Nova Scotia Anti-Protest Injunction

In Rights by poladmin

CCLA will be in the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal on April 11, 2022 seeking to protect the fundamental rights of Canadians to protest. The case relates to action taken by the Nova Scotia government in the Spring of 2021. At that time, the provincial Attorney General sought and was granted a special court order, called an injunction, by that province’s court. The order was obtained without the presence of any other parties, and while it was sought in relation to a particular planned protest challenging public health restrictions, the order effectively barred all public protest …