CCLA intervenes on parliamentary privilege and democracy

In Rights by poladmin

CCLA is intervening in a motion on Parliamentary privilege and when courts may review decisions made by a Legislative Assembly. This case has significant consequences for democracy, legislative autonomy, and the separation of powers. And it impacts the ability of any current or future majority government to disenfranchise an MPP’s constituents, leaving them without a meaningful voice in the Legislature.
In its intervention, CCLA argues that parliamentary privilege must be justified by its necessity to a Legislative Assembly’s “legislative or deliberative functions, or its role in holding the government accountable.”
The underlying challenge was brought by MPP Sarah

Read More

View Post

An outdated federal law prevents transit automation

In Politics by Michael Rae

Mass transit ridership in the United States cratered during the COVID-19 pandemic and has only been able to recover 74% of its 2019 riders. Despite moving far fewer people, transit costs have continued to rise. But even before the pandemic, the growth in transit operating costs and the failure to control them had plagued the industry for decades. 

Recent research finds that automation technologies widely in use outside the United States could dramatically reduce transit operating costs. But unless an outdated federal labor law known as Section 13(c) is repealed, transit agencies will struggle to implement automation and reduce expenses.

Until the

Read more at Reason.org

View Post

Pension Reform News: Analyzing Mississippi’s pension challenges, a costly reform rollback in Florida, and more

In Politics by Michael Rae

In This Issue:

Articles, Research & Spotlights 

Analysis of Mississippi’s Pension for Public Workers

Florida Legislature Considers Costly Reform Rollback

New Bill in Alaska Would Greatly Improve Retirement Benefits for Teachers

Success in Achieving Full Pension Funding

Perverse Incentives from Proposal to Use Citations to Fund a Missouri Pension

News in BriefQuotable Quotes on Pension Reform Data HighlightContact the Pension Reform Help Desk

Articles, Research & Spotlights

Examining the Mississippi Public Employee Retirement System’s Challenges  

The Mississippi Public Employees Retirement System, MPERS, faces significant headwinds in fulfilling the pension promises made to the state’s police, teachers, and other public workers. Persistent investment results below expectations and chronic underpayment into the pension

Read more at Reason.org

View Post

House Bill 481 would help prevent the politicization of Georgia’s public pension fund investments

In Politics by Michael Rae

Comments to the Georgia House of Representatives Retirement Committee on House Bill 481

Chairman John Carson and members of the committee:Thank you for the opportunity to offer our brief analysis of House Bill 481 (HB 481) and the need for more clarity about the fiduciary standards of public trustees. My name is David Morgan, and I serve as a government affairs associate at Reason Foundation. Our Pension Integrity Project team conducts quantitative public pension research and offers pro-bono technical assistance to officials and stakeholders aiming to improve pension resiliency and advance retirement security for public servants in a financially responsible way. Georgia’s public

Read more at Reason.org

View Post

Florida’s successful telehealth policies should be applied to address dental care shortages

In Politics by Michael Rae

Florida is leading the nation in health care reforms that can help unleash innovation and ensure patients have access to care as the state and country face of a growing physician shortage. Proposed legislation offers Florida lawmakers an opportunity to adopt a similar approach to dental care shortages in the state. 

A recent Reason Foundation report rates all 50 states’ telehealth policies and finds that Florida is among the top-rated states for adopting best practices. The state has broadly permissive laws and rules that don’t give preference to one mode of telehealth or category of provider over others, creating opportunities for future innovation. Florida’s

Read more at Reason.org

View Post

Many of Virginia’s public schools charge significant tuition to transfer students

In Politics by Michael Rae

Last year, six states signed strong K-12 open enrollment proposals into law. Half of these were passed with major bipartisan support. Already, policymakers in 16 states, including Virginia, have introduced at least 32 open enrollment proposals in 2024. These policies would let students attend public schools other than their residentially assigned schools.

While Virginia, along with most states, lets school divisions accept transfer students voluntarily, only 16 states have policies that require schools with extra space to accept transfer students from other school districts. Yet, even this doesn’t mean that every applicant has access. Virginia and 24 other states let school

Read more at Reason.org

View Post

A policy framework for personal psychedelics licenses

In Politics by Michael Rae

Executive Summary

This policy brief outlines a proposal to license consumers to purchase psychedelic substances. Similar to medical marijuana programs, psychedelics licenses would be overseen by a health professional and would be required for retail purchases. Psychedelic licenses for consumers have advantages over the current approach in two U.S. states that rely on professionals to dispense and facilitate services because consumer-based licenses are far more accessible and cost-effective than professional-based licenses. Sample legislation is provided in the appendix.

Introduction

Two American states are already in the process of implementing a regulated market for psychedelic therapies, and several more are being proposed in state

Read more at Reason.org