CCLA reacts to Prime Minister Trudeau’s testimony at POEC

In Rights by poladmin

OTTAWA — Cara Zwibel, Director of Fundamental Freedoms for the Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA), made the following statement:
Under cross examination by CCLA counsel Ewa Krajewska, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau agreed that the threshold for invoking the Emergencies Act shouldn’t be lower than the threshold for CSIS to surveil a single person.
Today’s admission by the Prime Minister confirms that the threshold before civil liberties can be severely restricted in the name of public order is a high one. CCLA maintains that the threshold was not met.

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About the Canadian Civil Liberties Association
The CCLA is an independent, non-profit organization with

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Mental Health is in Crisis. What Is the Answer?

In Analysis by Michael Rae

The US is still in a state of emergency for Covid-19 and monkeypox. However, the country has another longstanding and quickly worsening public health concern- mental health. According to mentalhealth.gov, about 20 percent of American adults experienced a mental health issue in 2020. Nearly 1 in 20 Americans live with a severe mental illness. 
Perhaps the most severe and heartbreaking consequence of mental illness is a patient’s decision to end their life. There were over twice as many suicides than homicides in 2020. Tragically, what motivates someone to commit suicide remains a mystery. Some choose to do so after enduring extreme hardship, trauma, or loss. In contrast,

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Renewable energy target raised to match corporate purchasing enthusiasm (blog)

In Energy by Michael Rae

When the Business Renewables Centre-Canada was founded in 2019, we set what we thought was an ambitious goal of securing two gigawatts worth of corporate renewable energy deals by 2025. That’s enough energy to power 640,000 homes. Companies in Alberta put their backs into it, and in May 2022, they

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Despite surplus, Smith government must restrain spending

In Research by Michael Rae

Author:

Tegan Hill

Governments in Alberta have a long history of increasing provincial spending during periods of high resource revenue, which inevitably leads to deficits once resource revenues decline.Read more about Despite surplus, Smith government must restrain spending Tags: alberta budgetalberta government financesalberta government spendingalberta sustainability fund

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CCLA reacts to Minister Freeland’s testimony at POEC

In Rights by poladmin

OTTAWA — Cara Zwibel, Director of Fundamental Freedoms for the Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA), made the following remarks today:
Today, Minister Freeland agreed that protest and civil disobedience are fundamental tenets of a healthy democracy.
She also agreed that in some instances these acts of protest whether at home or abroad can cause significant economic harm.
The CCLA has said all along that ‘economic harm’ is not grounds for the invocation of the Emergencies Act. The Emergencies Act and the CSIS act do not contemplate economic harm as a national emergency.
With just one day of testimony left, the Government is

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Properly designed impact fees could help Wakulla County accommodate population growth

In Politics by Michael Rae

Wakulla County, Florida, welcomed more than 4,100 new residents between 2010 and 2021, a 14% increase in the county’s population. New residential development provides an opportunity for economic growth. But costs are also associated with extending utilities and other services to new residents. Well-designed impact fees could help ensure that existing residents aren’t bearing undue costs.

Over the last few years, Wakulla County has added between 300 and 500 new homes annually. Higher home prices in Tallahassee have made Wakulla a relatively affordable and attractive place to settle for commuters. The rise of remote work during the COVID-19 pandemic has also

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Pension Reform News: ESG blueprint, Arizona’s pre-funding, and more

In Politics by Michael Rae

This newsletter from the Pension Integrity Project at Reason Foundation highlights articles, research, opinion, and other information related to public pension challenges and reform efforts across the nation. You can find previous editions here. 

In This Issue: 

Articles, Research & Spotlights  

A blueprint for protecting public funds from ESG and politicization 

Arizona’s innovation for multi-employer pension plans 

Challenges in inflation protection for Texas teachers 

Retention trends in the public workforce suggest the need for portability 

What U.S. pensions can learn from the U.K. margin call 

News in Brief Quotable Quotes on Pension Reform  

Articles, Research & Spotlights 

Reason’s New Blueprint for ESG-related Legislation

Reason Foundation’s Pension Integrity Project has developed an ESG Blueprint

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Why teacher salaries are flat as school spending soars

In Politics by Michael Rae

In a recent poll published by Harvard’s Education Next, 60 percent of respondents, and nearly half the Republicans surveyed, thought teachers should be paid more than their statewide average. With red states such as Florida, Oklahoma, and Iowa prioritizing the issue in 2022, an important question policymakers should be asking is why record levels of public-education spending haven’t already led to teachers being paid more.

Nationwide, inflation-adjusted average teacher salaries have been nearly flat since the turn of the century, going from $64,986 in 2000 to $65,090 in 2021. But there’s significant variation among states, with inflation-adjusted pay increasing by 10 percent or more in nine

Read more at Reason.org